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story" is next. and check us out 24 hours a day on aljazeera.com. ♪ from washington. hello, i'm libby casey. it's gone on and on, and shows no clear end the war in syria between president bashar al-assad forces and a myriad of rebel groups and islamist fight whose want to see him out of power. there are talks while offering small help to rebels. many are expressing frustration over the situation on the ground, and they have their own political objective. as refugees suffer and the conflict grinds on where do we go from here? first this background. secretary of state john kerry is again this week working with middle east allies to keep attention on the syrian crisis. arriving in saudi arabia over the weekend chief ambassador was helping the relationship between the two countries. >> i particularly wanted to have the opportunity to visit with his majesty the king of saudi arabia, and i'm particularly grateful because i know that he is not seeing enormous numbers of people these days, but right now we have very important things to talk about to make certain that the saudi arabian
we have very important things to talk about to make certain that the saudi arabian u.s. relationship is on track, moving forward, and doing the things that we need to accomplish. >> washington's main arab ally has concerns with the approach to the conflict in syria. they acknowledge there are divergent obviously on how to end conflict, but the goal remains the same. >> even a limited strike will send a message to assad that no other nation can deliver. but a targeted strike can make assad or any other dictator think twice before using chemical weapons. >> but despite president obama's tough talk a strike never happened. instead the assad regime grayed to account for and aid in destroying it's chemical weapons stock pile. for the u.s. the condition in syria is status quo. meanwhile 2 million syrian versus fled their homes and more are displaced in the country as war conditions. rebels have lost ground to assad forces. neighboring nations are shaking under the weight of refugees, especially lebanon. it now has more than 800,000 syrians nearly a quarter of lebanon's population of $4 mil
talks that resumed in geneva today between iran and six world powers, including the u.s. is the second round of negotiations on iran's nuclear program since president hassan rouhani took office in august. the proposal would partially with u.s.-led sanctions for six months in return for iran's suspension of nuclear activity. john kerry continues a visit to israel and the occupied west bank in a bid to encourage u.s.- brokered peace talks. he faced palestinian complaints in ramallah on tuesday over israel's continued expansion of west bank settlements. in a rare move, john kerry said the u.s. views israel settlements as illegitimate, going beyond the normal white house language of not helpful. but john kerry stopped short of calling the settlements illegal. >> let me emphasize at this point the position of the united states of america on the considerts is that we now, and have always considered, the settlements to be illegitimate. i want to make it extremely clear that at no time did the agree asans in any way a matter of going back to the talks that they someh condone or
extend the disability rights of americans to disabled people in other countries. the u.s. signed onto the treaty in 2009, but ratification the senate failed in 2012. this hearing is just over 2.5 hours. >> the hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me welcome our panelists and all of our guests who have come here today for this important hearing on the rights of roughly one billion people around the world with disabilities. let me quickly welcome three guests. among them, congressman tony coelho, who has been a longtime champion of the rights of the disabled. let me also recognize ann cody, representing the u.s. on three paralympic teams. she was also nominated to be the vice president of the international paralympic committee. she understands it is not just enough to make the stadium accessible. you need to make surrounding restaurants and businesses accessible, and we thank you for being here or your advocacy as well. i also want to recognize a leader in the disability community in macedonia. she is here to learn about transportation and independen
program uses sophisticated buy metric checks to decide who should get a handout of rations. it is a massive logistical exercise that costs $8 million a month. kenya has paid a heavy price and the time is now right for refugees to go. the reactions are calculated to make sure each person gets just enough nutrition to survive. earlier this month, the agency announced it was cutting food by a quarter, thanks to a budget shortfall. >> the reduction in rations has nothing to do with the agreement. it is just a coincidence. the refugees don't see it that way. for them, it sends a very clear message that both the kenyans have had enough of them. >> this man understands how his community feels. he knows are nobody who thinks somalia is now safe. >> i want to thank the unhcr and kenyan government for hosting us, but as a 11 gee leader, i don't think many are willing to go back. >> very few. i'm not sure any will go right now. >> if you want to get a sense of just how things still are in somalia, consider this. the place that refugees run to is always better than the home they've lef
in the middle east. >>> this is free solo climbing or scaling a mountain without a rope. to us non-climbers, the best free soloist in the world will tell us what it's like to climb a mountain with nothing but your bear hands and chalk. welcome to "consider this." new jersey governor chris christie with an historic win in a big blue state. and in virginia agency race it was a suspenseful night with a race between a democrat and a conservative republican. it's where tea partyers got top billing. we'll take a sneak peek of staying power tha , and the seismic shift to the left. i'm joined which jeff warren, and bill snyder, professor at george washington university. they're both in our washington, d.c. studios, and here in studio with me is tom doherty, former senior adviser to george pataki. bill, let's start with you. chris christie, a big win. but when you look at the exit polls in a hypothetical match up to hillary clinton he would lose in his own state. >> it tells us that new jersey is still a blue state, and hillary clinton is still a very popular figure there. look, christie wo
from state department and u.s. aid officials held by the foreign relations subcommittee. this is live coverage on c-span3. >>> good morning. let me welcome you all to the subcommittee on east asia and the pacific for the senate foreign relations committee. let me thank chairman menendez for allowing us to conduct this subcommittee hearing on such short notice. senator rubio, thank you very much for your help and your staff's help in arranging this hearing in record time. when we say the senate can't act quickly, we did act quickly on putting this hearing together, and i very much appreciate that, all the people who worked to make this possible. nice to see you again, we were together yesterday, billy, referred to that, but the filipino ambassador to the united states is a friend and has been extremely helpful to us. shortly after the typhoon, we had a chance to talk, and at that time i expressed our deep condolence on the loss of life as a result of the typhoon, and america's interest to exercise leadership internationally in assisting the filipinos in the recovery, saving lives, and
forth. away from that. our hope is the process of the next months and years will unable us to do that. thank you, chairman menendez, for convening our second hearing to consider the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. think you, secretary kerry, for your ongoing leadership. protecting the rights of disabled persons has historically garnered the support of all americans. ratification would solidify the strong u.s. commitment to equal opportunity for disabled persons, protection for disabled americans abroad, wounded veterans. greatear we missed a opportunity. it's my hope that we don't make the same mistake again. mr. secretary, this entire hearing strikes me as revisiting important fundamental issues that need to be asked and answered to reassure those of my constituents who have not heard yes yet. in your view, what is the response to critics who charge the sea rpd that would violate u.s. sovereignty, and the disabilities committee would be empowered under this treaty to dictate how the iron states treat people with disabilities here at home. sovereignty,ct to ther
>> in addition to announcing a review of u.s. ties, the pakistani government also summoned the u.s. ambassador to warn of a standoff and less drone attacks ceased. also financing the strike from the leading pakistani opposition leader imran kahn proposed a ban on nato supply trucks inside pakistan. ofn accused the u.s. sabotaging the peace talks. >> i feel sad that just as the dialogue was about to start take, those who are still part in the talks, were killed yesterday. >> the pakistani taliban has sayed asly picked kahn its new leader. the suspect in friday's armed attack at the los angeles international airport could face the death penalty for shooting dead a transportation security administration officer and wounding five other people. is charged with murdering a federal officer and committing violence at an international airport. the head of the police at lax described the attack. >> at 9:20 this morning, in individual came into terminal 3 of this airport, pulled an assault rifle out of a bag and began to open fire in the terminal. he proceeded up into the screening area wher
in the initial days of the troubled website. >> a stunning admission by the u.s., john kerry admits some surveillance has gone too far, just as giant tech companies push back against the government. >> the bottom line is people are going to go hungry. >> the federal cuts making it harder for struggling families to put food on the table. >> a threatened species makes a comeback. the salmon population is pushed toward record numbers. >> good morning, good to have you with us on this friday with that welcome to aljazeera america. >> for more than a month now, the obama administration has been saying how many millions of people have visited the health care website, but they have kept quiet about exactly how many have enrolled, insisting they do not have those numbers. >> new documents show the white house has a pretty good idea. >> even the president admits healthcare.gov has problems. >> the website is too slow, too many people have gotten stuck. >> just how many people have gotten stuck or how many ever enrolled are figures the obama administration has been denying the public for days now.
will join us and other countries. there are some very, very serious efforts being developed everywhere to try and make this conference possible. but, you know, we will say it when it happens. >> reporter: let's go to al jazeera and in beirut in lebanon where they are going in the coming hours and they say geneva two will not happen or go ahead without opposition but that are divided whether to take part and the conditions it wants for doing so. >> absolutely. they said it would be preferable to have one opposition united speaking under the same umbrella or attending under the same umbrella, which is actually not the position of either syria or russia. they seem to think there are several oppositions and they seem to think or they are backing what is called the domestic opposition, that means opposition parties that are based in damascus and never taken up weapons against the government. so you do have very difficult issue to solve there before going to the geneva two conference if it happens. also you have to bear in mind that the geneva two conference will implement geneva one and it
, but it has made a difference in our country and he inspired many of us to be involved in politics. much legislation sprang from inch of rain his original agenda but we will talk more about that this afternoon. just remembering always that resident kennedy said children are our greatest resources and best hope for future and hopefully that will be the spirit of this budget that we think in terms of our children, their families and their future. thank you all. .. >> the world of cable from that of author with the big picture. >> secretary of state john kerry told the senate foreign committee that the united states should ratify the disability act. >> good morning, this hearing on the sena aate floor of the righ of people with disability comes to other. let me thank secretary kerry for being here. first, i think he has the thanks of all us on the committee for the incredible work you have been doing across the globe. and your presence sends a strong message about the importance of the issue. we appreciate you coming back to chair. we received the support of thousands of people and organiza
h. this is al jazeera. >> hello there, welcome our top stories. any deal keeping u.s. troops won't get final approval until after he leaves office. >> with all the news from europe, as three women are freed by police in london, after being held as slaves for 30 years. and no release, ukraine's refuses and drops plans for a landmark trade deal with europe. also ahead, go home. somali refugees in kenya have told they have to leave, they say that will put them back in danger. and on the frail of the lizard kings. the world's most notorious wild life trafficker. afghanistan's president has announced he won't sign an agreement to keep u.s. troops there after next year. they should support the deal, but that he would leave it to the next president to give its final approval. elections are due in 24 teen. one of the most contention issues in the security packet is giving u.s. troops immunity from prosecution under afghan law. as well as the right to self-defense. but only if forces ask them to, and finally troops numbers. if the draft is signed up to 15,000 american soldiers could stay
>>> talking tough on drones - thousands are expected in peshawar to protest against u.s. strikes on pakistan. >> opposition leader imran khan wants nato's routes blocked. he's calling for a strike. also coming up: heading to the polls in maurey tainia. the opposition boycotting. >> typhoon haiyan 's vulnerable victims. the u.n. calls for action to help the 4 million children affected by the storm. >> paper or toxic - the indian government made its choice clear, but so far it seems no one is listening. >> in pakistan thousands are expected to take to the streets of peshawar and are rallying in support of opposition politician imran khan who wants the government to stop the u.s. drone program in pakistan. kahn has given the prime minister sharif a period of time to act. he's threatening to close routes through his province. there is an alternative route. but it is bysier. we will hear more about the protest that will take place. >> yes, indeed. as you can see behind me plenty of flags. the people have started arriving. as usual, they are off to a late start. interestingly, as you m
to does his support for the treaty. i know, that the secretary changed his schedule to be with us today. he's a keynote speaker at the disability-related event this evening in new york. we'll be excusing him around 4:30 or so do so. secretary, we're pleased for joining us. thank you for rearranging your schedule today. i will leave congresswoman duckworth to be recognized by senator dire bin. someone who has done a tremendous amount of work on the cannot of veteran's affairs and personal testimony about her personal experience as a wounded warrior is invaluable to the committee. i want to ask former attorney general who is here to discuss the practical importance of ratification, and let me also recognize his wife, jenny, who is accomplished in the field of disability advocacy. we appreciate you being here as well. let me ask dr. susan from the catholic family and human rights institute. professor timothy meyer, the assistant professor school of law. and michael faris to join us as well as they offer their views on the treaty. thank you, all. let me turn to senator occur bib. >> t
's needed the most. this is where international assistance is coming in, especially from the u.s., but also from the european union and many other countries in the world. there has been an outpouring of generosity directed at the philippines. we know the first world food program cargo has already left from malaysia. that should be arriving imminently in this country. this is a situation that is not without controversy. there have been some reports of widespread looting and there have been some accusations that the government has not done enough to really clamp down on that looting. some have been suggesting that there should even be marshal law in some of the affected areas and there has been talk of a state of emergency. the president said that the first priority is to deliver aid to the people who need it the most. this is what he had to say. >> and also for those that have been confirmed killed, that is a concern. we have a need for those who are living, those who are injured, the need for footd and the need for water. >> there seems to be a lack of visibility on the exact number of fata
the country. the u.n. expects it to be above 3 million by the end of this year. joining us on the phone from geneva is the united nations office lens from the coordination of humanitarian affairs. in the past three months we have seen 3.8 million extra people needing help, it is an enormous jump. why is that? >> it is an enormous jump, numbers are staggering. we are 9.3 million in syria are estimated to be in need of humanitarian aid. 6.5 million are internally displaced. this high figure is an incemental displacement which has happened over the past month. the last statement was made in june. now, since june it has jumped up to the 40% of the population as you mentioned. >> i'm trying to get to the bottom of why this is so. back in october there was a united nations security council statement urging humanitarian access to these people, and it appears since then absolutely nothing has been done. >> well, we have expressed our disappointment with what has not happened since the precedential statement, which calls on all the parties to the conflict in syria to allow humanitarian access to the
. statehood can be a fiction that hides dangers lurking beneath. all of these challenges will be with us for the foreseeable future. there is not a short-term vision to these are a first century threats. we must manage through these realities as we engage these complex problems. staying focused on our long-term interests and long-term objectives and outcomes. the imperfect outcomes may be the most we can expect, working our way toward the higher ground of possible solutions. leveraging all aspects of our power, we must multiply and enhance our efforts by working through coalitions of common interest like nato. this is in fact our future. just as we have done since world war ii, but it now may be more essential than ever before. while these challenges are not america's responsibilities alone, they will demand america's continued engagement. no other nation, no other nation has the will, the power, the cast the, "he, and a network of alliances to lead international community in addressing them. however, sustaining our leadership will increasingly depend not only on the extent of an great p
of reasons. >> can you say it one more time? >> i'm often, can really compete for the u.s. on a level playing field basis with everyone else said why don't we build anything? in fact, we felt a lot here and it's time it came from athens, georgia last evening because yesterday we cut the ribbon on a brand-new greenfield factory 850,000 square feet. 1400 people strong when it's fully operational at the end of next year. these will be small bulldozers and small excavators that were formally only produced in japan. we brought those to the united states for several reasons. one, we can compete from the base there to relate the ports in here and that production will stay in the u.s. in the exported to south america and europe. we feel there is a very good chance at a very good condition to not only build here, but compete to a u.s. base. a year ago we did the same thing in victoria, texas on another excavator plan. these are the large machines. 42 that 5010 machines that came in from japan that will be built in us for the first time in the united states and exporting to south america. some of that
because part of the systems where the chances for a debt for another is one in 20,000 where it used to be the most common killer of women in the mid part of a letter century. if you have to have assembled gallbladder operation or you have a child with a complication of a long problem, he will suddenly asked which plays are you going? you have to go here. and that is a firm that we haven't lifted, but we can. and i think there are interesting ways to know how to read >> thank you, everybody. >> in january, 1963, they had done something they didn't do before to the the the state and they fought and as a result, five american were shot down, three americans were killed. kennedy sees this on the front page and says what's going on here? i thought we were winning this war. over the course of the next several months in fact in december and janaria into february he was going to hear varying reports from white house officials, state department officials and military officials giving the contradictory evidence about the state of the military campaign in south viet nam. >> 48 hours of nonfict
honduras heads to the post >> a cutting edge community that studies how we use and and abue power. they say this is the neighborhood of the future. ♪ >> after days of talks and a final 18 hour marathon in geneva world powers have made a deal with iran over their nuclear program. i ran has agreed to curb their nuclear activities. in a moment we'll cross live in teheran where so some people are criticizing their end of the deal. mike han i hanna is in israel ad israel is claiming this is a mistake. first we have how the events up folded. >> at 3:00 in the morning again into havgenevatime they struck l in talks that were described as intensive and complicated. it met with an immediate response from the u.s. president. today that has opened up a new path to a world that is more secure. to a feuder tha feud future thay that iran is peaceful. today's announcement is just a first step it achieves a great teal. deal. for the first time in a decade we have halted the nuclear program. >> iran's foreign minister described new horwood ry horwoo. >> i believe it's important that all of us se
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: embassies used as spying outposts in asia; tapping into google and yahoo's internal networks. new reports on the breadth of n.s.a. surveillance stoke outrage at home and abroad. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. also ahead this thursday, iraq's prime st vits washington asking for help to stem a recent spate of bloodshed. >> ifill: and while abraham lincoln is widely revered as the man who kept the union together, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved econo
for us having the center we are saving 3 billion a year. the fact we are moving from datacenter spiritedly generated through carbon, having it at a renewable center was a big advantage in something i have always wanted. >> i think there are some best best practices of state and local governments. we see the best practices occur a projectwill appoint manager to shepherd personal cell phone, give details 24 hours a day, call us, and we will solve the obstacle. opportunitiesl are more standard there are some sharings they have been across the board. wax one thing we talked about is infrastructure. maybe just share a little bit about what we could be doing to make sure we are investing in our infrastructure. >> this is near and dear to me. around the world, every leader is looking for a way to find jobs, and they have lack of capital for infrastructure. that is how they can create more jobs. one thing that is very clear, when you look at countries that infrastructure, there is a partnership between public and private. it is imperative that we have a policy for infrastructure buildin
. >> former president mohamed morsi - a visit from the u.s. secretary of state. >> i'm kath turner in new york where officials are battling two unprecedented events - hurricane sandy, and the two boston marathon bombings. >>> let's take you straight to cairo, where the u.s. secretary of state john kerry is holding a press conference with the egyptian foreign minister. i believe that we are listening to nazar speaking. >>... we believe that they are important for egypt. we'd like to further enhance this relationship in the interests of both countries, based on the priorities of each country. this afternoon, mr secretary, you are due to meet with the president and general abdul fatah al-sisi. for our part here at the foreign ministerry, we held constructive, frank and detailed construction of various issues and discussed how to move things forward in the interests of both countries. i affirm egypt's desire to have good and point of view relationship with the united states, based on our own priorities. >> translation: we'll open the floor for questions and then meet the president. >> we'll give
. >> attorney general thornberg, we all recognize that the u.s. is the gold standard on disability rights. if we're at the gold standard, i mean, i certainly understand why it's in our best interest to have other countries obligate themselves to meet our gold standard, but i don't get why we should be ratifying a treaty that obligates us to do things that are still open to or subject to interpretation. that's my concern. i think that's the core concern of those that may not be supportive of the treaty currently. can you explain that to me? >> i think so. the basic gap in understanding is what the consequences of ruds are. the treaty that's adopted includes the reservations in understandings and deck collar rations that accompany it. when we say we're not going to do something that we specified we do not include within the am bit of the treaty amended by ruds, it doesn't mean we flout convention, but that we implement it with the ruds in mind, and that's true not only of what the united states does, but other countries -- >> if we're the gold standard, what do we have to interpret in implementing
comfortable, obviously. we want to pass this. it is not lost on any of us that only 11 months ago the senate fell just five votes short of approving this treaty. so more than 60 senators have already resolved in their minds many of the questions that are reraised again and again. we can go into them. those days when we ended up five votes short, when people changed so it was closer, that was a rough day for a lot of us who supported the treaty, including senator mccain, who is hardly a newcomer to this issue and is one of the most eloquent voices for why we ought to be doing this, for why, to put it bluntly, this treaty is in america's interests. in the after-action conversations that i have had with many senators, republicans and democrats alike, and including a number of who voted against the treaty -- you saw senator corker and others -- i even heard some regret about what had transpired and the unintended message that the outcome sent to americans with disabilities, as well as other people around the world. and i heard from many, not just a willingness, but a hope that they would have a
will curtail it's uranium enrichment program. in exchange the u.s. will release $7 billion worth of frozen assets. secretary kerry said any deal is fragile, and iran must keep up its end of the bargain. >> this is not going to change overnight. we have a long building process to engage in here. we need to put to test iran's words and intentions without any cobwebs, without any false assumptions, without any illusions. this is a hard road. >> reporter: top temperature low mats flew to geneva to say what appear to be stalled talks. the p 5 plus one. that's six world powers including the united states, france, britain, germany, china and russia agree that iran will temporarily leave uranium enrichment to above 5%, permit daily monitoring by international inspectors, halt construction of the iraq heavy water reactor. iran's new president a hassan rouhani, welcome the agreement and say he saw it as an affirmation as the country's right to enrich uranium. >> iran will continue it's enrichment. therefore i announce to the people of iran that enrichment will continue in the same way as bef
. and i applaud the u.s. this leadership. and then on the logistics, i one really do thank our department of defense. i they understand how to get to people who have been isolated e and to get a better assessment. let me point out one obvious ano point here. p most of the damage was done on s the coast. and that's what we saw.tha we could reach the coast.t' we could not reach communities isolated from the coast. therefore, initially, there wasn't a good understanding as to the severity of the damage inland. do we now have some indication as to whether there is going to be additional significant losses as a result of reaching people that we weren't able to reach originally?cant los >> thank you, senator. we did initially focus on the coast. we also did initial over-land and overflight assessments in some of the inland areas, as as well, working with our dod rkini colleagues. our initial assessment was that. l areas were the worst affected so that was the first priority for focus.at as that situation has started to stabilize, maybe too strong a word but let's say head in the e direction o
th region that the u.s. military, u as you said, in addition to to being an unmatched fighting force, also brings unmatched logistical capabilities. which they use, unfortunately al have to use quite often in the f region for disaster response. i think that's gone widely noticed. i wouldn't want to speculate on why the chinese have responded the way they have. i do know at some point d philippine authorities suggestet there was no need for further gd medical equipment and support, r whether that played a role on ma the hospital ship not coming, i'm not sure. ship i think the more important point from our perspective is by doing the right thing, we've seen seen in the region as doing the righe thing.st >> well, just my editorial comment to close, and i don't expect you to respond to it, bur we have this debate going on in this country how engaged the u.s. needs to be around the world diplomatically in aid programs, and of course militarily with our presence. this is an example what would mi happen if the u.s. did retreat e from the global stage.. there is no substitute for the united
to defy his own party to some extent but it didn't occur to us to think these poor people. i also believe this was not stimulated by the politicians. this is genuine public anger. >> and appointed fairness the house republicans leadership step up and john boehner, eric cantor, paul ryan. >> they replace their negotiator >> they had no negotiator. >> yes they did. >> they still had a majority voting against them. >> understand but let's give credit where it is due. >> in my experience when the house leadership republican house leadership cares they do better than the minority of their own party. >> i have serious reservations about that characterization. i think a lot of people went to the floor on that monday and voted no because they thought the leadership have the votes to pass the bill. they couldn't gather -- gavel back in. i think that was true of both sides. >> not so much on your side. nobody ever casts political votes on your side. >> on this one judd wait a second. it's about politicians and politics and i know that may upset some people because we are only supposed to these talk
that the committee does not become a vehicle for creating international legal obligations contrary to u.s. interests. could you further explain why you think it is in the u.s. interest to have an american serving on the committee created by this convention? >> one of the ways in which the committee can have a legal effect even though its recommendations are nonbinding is through the creation of customary international law. the committee clearly does not have the power to create it, but its recommendations that other states react and adopt, there can be a basis for a claim that there is customary international law therefore the opportunity for the united states to appear to object to interpretations of the committee that might be thought to give rise to obligations could potentially defeat the formation that the united states would view as unacceptable. there are examples of this occurring in the context of, for example, the human rights committee taking positions that certain rules of the state department they are not agreeing with. not ratifying the convention does not remove the ability to object
>>> sealing the deal the u.s. and afghanistan reach a tentative agreement that will keep thousand of american troops there after 2014. now hamid karzai must sell the idea to tribal leaders. >> trey raydull takes a leave of absence after pleading guilty to drug possession. >> and rising from the ashes, a volcanic eruption in japan creates an island in the pacific ring of fire. >> good morning and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. the future of american troops in afghanistan is being decided by a group of afghan tribal leaders. afghan and american leaders said yes to a security deal and today afghan president hamid karzai is pushing a council to accept it. the decision now lies with the loya jirga. >> translation: you are here representing the afghan nation. i was under pressure not to organise the loya jirga. when it comes to issues of national significance it is important to hold the jirgas. >> up to 15,000 troops could remain in the region if the security pact is signed, including 8,000-12,000 american troops. >> it is entirely train, equip and assist - there is no
. they have both sides of this deal. they can denounce the deal the u.s. still has important military relationships with the state of israel that are effectively unperturbed by this that willugh continue, including undertakings and understandings about what the u.s. will do to protect our common security interest rates that might be threatened by iran that are unaffected by the israeli denunciation of the atlomacy that helps them home and hedges against things that might go wrong in that diplomacy. they noticed a lot of other people who were concerned about iran and making statements that say, "i do not trust iran" in effect. who does? the policies of this and the percentages in the different place. i have some empathy. say theywhen people support new sanctions, but the sanctions would be made conditional on waiting to see whether or not we failed to get a final deal and the sanctions might then be put on a suspense so they would go into effect after efforts to get a final deal. if you study what is involved, you will see how much iran's good faith will be tested by all of the activit
. with the rain we won't be able to do this. this small treat will be taken away from us. >> preparations to get the camp ready for winter are well under way. drainage systems are being put in place to make sure the camp doesn't floods. this man from the unrefugee agency says things are on track, but there's a long way to go. >> there'll be challenges, like any other program. but we are going to support the international community for the winter. >> there's a huge difference between a camp being ready for winter and the reality of having to actually live there. dispute harsh winter conditions, children find a way to smile and have fun. >> these children take advantage of the relatively mild weather before the severe winter comes, but it almost doesn't matter how well prepared the camp is. the one thing that these children and residents of the camp wants is the one thing the aid agencies can't give them, and that's a safe passage back to a peaceful syria. the return to syria is a distant dream, there are more pressing things to worry about. >> 10 days ago it rained. the camp was flooded. my tent
. we all acknowledge that the treaty is based upon basically the u.s. law, the ada. we passed that in 1990. i remember in 1991, congressman hoyer who was then chairman of u.s. helsinki commission traveled to moscow and became part of the moscow declaration document, which started the international effort to use u.s. law as the model to protect universal -- university the rights of people with disabilities. so the united states has been leadership. the point i would raise, that failed to ratify i think compromises the u.s. ability to advance these standards globally. it weakens our own credibility to participate in the development internationally of the rights of people with disabilities and is the chairman pointed out and as others have pointed out it also compromises very much american citizens who are in other countries and their own protections if we happen to ratify the treaty we're sorting out in the same position as we would for the rights of people in our own country. secretary ridge, your comments, generally. >> i just wanted to respond to a but a very appropriate ques
was killed. a boeing 737 was attempting to land when it went down. >> a u.s. drone crashed into a navy ship off the coast of jeb corlis. two sailors were hurt. the -- off the coast of jeb corlis, two sailors were hurt. u.s. navy was testing the ship's combat weapons system. they are the headlines. we planned to bring you a documentary called "tiny", but stayed tuned to a special documentary live from the philippines. "tiny" will air next week. >> "america tonight", i'm joie chen reporting from tacloban. >> it's the largest of the cities to be struck and destroyed by the super typhoon. it was not the first. it belongs to an outlier on the point known as gewan and we met a number of people there looking to start new lives. she had been waiting at the airport for two days. and the anxiety overwhelmed her. please, she pleaded. my husband died in the storm. i have nothing left. i need to get my two kids out. this would not be her turn. >> there'll be more slides. those that lost so much would get out. given the tragedy the storms must seem like a last hope. >> in the week since the storm came he
to actually affect the individual lives of citizens here in the country? is there a way of us coming together and writing ruds in that way? >> senator, thank you for the question. i think with respect to the federalism issue, a federalism reservation could address the federalism problem that you've identified. federalism reservation could, i think, be drafted to be somewhat stronger than the reservation that currently reservation attached to the resolution for ratification that came out last year. conceivably such a reservation would make very clear what the e numb rated powers that congress possesses are. and reserve out of any obligations that couldn't be satisfied through the exercise of those powers. with respect to the interpretation issue, i think a set of understanding could be drafted that would make very clear that the united states does not accord any significance to the interpretation of the convention afforded by the committee. i think it would go a long way toward addressing the concern that the convention might be used to interpret federal statutes including essentially preexist
, not under any circumstances. for us, they are red lines that cannot be crossed. the rights of the iranian nation are our red lines. national interests are our red lines, and that includes our rights under the framework of international regulations and enrichment on a rainy and soil. apparente the breakdown, both sides say progress has made -- been made and have resume to -- agreed to meetings next week. as we leaveoser now geneva than when we came, and with the work in good faith over we can, inw weeks, fact, secure our goal. we came to geneva to narrow the , and i can tell you without any exaggeration, we not only narrow differences and clarified those that remain, but we made significant progress in working through the approaches of how onestion reins in a program and guarantees its peaceful nature. kerry said he expects an agreement within the next couple of months. a group of lawmakers is moving ahead to tighten sanctions on iran. prime minister benjamin netanyahu continued his campaign against an iranian nuclear deal. dangerous bad and deal, a deal that would affect our survival. whe
. hamid karzai told them he received a letter from barack obama assuring him u.s. troops would raid afghan homes in exceptional circumstances. >> translation: our loya jirga has only got one purpose - that is to discuss and deeply investigate the security agreement with the u.s. you are here representing the afghan nation, my dear elders, scholars, clergy and everyone else. you are representing a nation that has suffered for the last 40 years. you are gathered here to look at a vital issue for the afghan nation and discuss and consult about that issue. i was under pressure not to organise a loya jirga. but when it comes to issues of national significance it is important to hold the loya jirga. >> let's look closer at the u.s.-afghan deal that could see up to 15,000 foreign troops stay in the country. the draft bilateral agreement, or bsa gives washington essentially what it wanted - immunity from prosecution for u.s. forces and gives them the right of self-defence; permission to carry out house raids after 2014, but only at the afghan military's invitation. jane ferguson is live in kabul.
in multiple cities friday to protest the u.s. drone war. demonstrators staged a massive sit in blocking a nato supply line. the action followed a strike that killed the pakistani head of the taliban, jeopardizing peace talks. in an interview, pakistani s accused theader u.s. of undermining peace. >> if there were a chance for peace talks, we should have grabbed it. while the interior minister did his best, i am disappoint in the way the prime minister has taken this peace pross. this should have been his number one priority. the americans could have taken him out when they wanted. the timing was to sabotage the peace process. >> clashes have erupted in saudi arabia come in cracking down on foreign workers. at least two people were killed and dozens injured after police confronted workers on saturday. meanwhile, in cutter, a human expert is calling for a reform in workers rights. they say that guest workers are being housed in squalor. in the is a stain reputation of qatar, the richest country per capita. they should not allow this to be created on its territory. there are means of making this
will have a host country that can work with us to affect the destruction outside of syria of these precursor chemicals. secondly, our cooperation with the russian federation has so far been strong. we will continue to expect the russian government to press the syrian government for full compliance with its obligations. this will be essential as we move ahead. third, we continue this process with our eyes wide open. we are about to enter what could be the most complicated phase in terms of both logistics and security. that is, the removal of chemical precursors in large quantities from several sites within syria to the coast for removal on a ship to another country. that has both big logistical problems to think through and certain security risks. at the same time, while the record so far is acceptable, we do not assume or take for granted that the syrian government will continue full compliance with its obligations. we have the tools we need granted by the opcw executive committee and by the united nations security council to press ahead on this goal. we intend to do so. this is why our stat
, but that maybe a vain hope and rebels tell us they will resume attacks on the army if it continues what it calls ethnic cleansing in an area they hope to turn into an independent state. our reporter mohamed went to meet them. >> it's a source of deep anger among the rebels. civilians crossing the border almost every week with wounds and stories of killing by the mali army. they tell al jazeera how they spent days in chains being beaten and verbally abused. they say soldiers arrested them in the desert while they were herding sheep accusing them of being rebels. one colleague is in critical condition and being treated in a local medical center. across the border in mali the national movement and allies in the high council for unity are in a permanent state here. . >> translator: mali killed and forces us to pay for them, just like what al-qaeda does to europeans and mali doesn't have a single fighter in jail and can arrest innocent and unarmed civilians. >> reporter: a peace agreement signed in june say that gather in specific areas and store weapons in return for guarantees the army would not
on and ratifying that it puts us in the addition to get the world to move in the direction so that tammy will be ablemark to travel anywhere and have a greater likelihood that they have the access to fulfill their god-given potential whether it is in a job, business, advocacy and they will be able to achieve. american businesses who already lead the world in terms of accessibility standards, that will be the standard that others adopt so that the football player from rutgers who has this able tolchair will be travel other places and will likely be having the other access. that is why the ratification of the treaty expands our reach and advocacy not simply by reflection of looking at with the united states does but its advocates. it's a very good question that has been raised and it deserves a full answer. >> chairman, could i offer a few -- cardin and we will get you to work it in. .- senator cardin >> i will try to leave you time. from the written statement which i think is a very appropriate. you should not be so proud to think that we could not learn from other countries about how to
from the u.s. so many in a few days. here we see this happening now, a week later. the question is why? is it an underestimation? >> and, steph, we know that president benigno aquino has taken control of the relief operation. has that made a difference in the speeding up of getting relief, getting aid to people? >> i think the government initially thought they could handle it. they thought they could deal with this. a few days into the dasser they realised it was a different scope, a different magnitude altogether. now it seems things are moving in faster. coordination is better, goods are going to go, but we have the next problem. when i visited yesterday i could feel a lot of frustration of survivors. they said, "we need all the aid goods to be given to us, not the government, because then we won't get it at all." there's a lot of frustration towards the government altogether among the survivors of the disaster. >> thank you very much for that update. steph joining us from cebu airport. >> to other news - british prime minister david cameron gave sri lanka's government until march t
living this program cause the u.s. house is about a gavel in and members will start their legislative day and hold one minute speeches on any topic. legislative work starts at 5:00 eastern. members will debate by bills including one to create a website to list all government any votes requested will take place at 6:30 eastern. now, live to the house for. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. loving and gracious god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. help us this day to draw closer to you so that with your spirit and aware of your presence among us, we may all face the tasks of this day. bless the members of the people's house. help them to think clearly, speak confidently and act courageously in the belief that all noble service is based upon patience, truth and love. may they be great enough to be humble and good enough to keep their faith always regarding public office as a sacred trust. give them the courage and the wisdom to fail not their fellow ci
and scenes of devastation charred and i will bring you the latest. >> afghanistan president wants to stop u.s. soldiers searching afghan homes and the security pack may be at risk. >> tacloban is enough is enough. >> reporter: determined to recover, we look at how the philippines is trying to rebuild after a devastating typhoon. ♪ welcome to the show, we begin in lebanon where there have been two massive explosions in the capitol. at least 23 people have been killed including an iranian diplomate. it happened near the embassy in southern beirut and unclear what caused explosions but thought at least one of them was a car bomb and it happened in a neighborhood a few hundred meters away from the iranian embassy and rob reynolds has the latest details. >> reporter: the explosions were so powerful they turned cars into twisted piles of metal, tour the facade off buildings and gouged craters outside the iran embassy and smoke rose from burning vehicles. firefighters rushed to the scene trying to help the wounded. there are conflicting reports about the source of the blast and some saying they
.m. and to boston at the jfk presidential library and museum for a musical tribute with james taylor, and the u.s. naval academy women's elite club performing selections from the president's state funeral. earlier today john kerry testified at why he was thinking it was important to ratify a disabilities treaty. efforts to ratify the treaty failed last year. this hearing is an hour, 20 minutes. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> good morning. this hearing will come to order. let the first start by thanking secretary kerry for being with us today for this second hearing on the ratification of the crpd, and i think, first, you have the thanks of us for the incredible work you have been doing on behalf of our country, and your presence today sends a strong message about the importance of this issue. we appreciate you taking the time to come back to the committee to support the treaty. we convene the second hearing on ratification, having received the support of thousands of people and organizations, all of whom are look
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